LifestyleAsia.com (© Copyright (c) Lifestyle HK Ltd. 2013, All Rights Reserved.)
Updated: Tuesday, 10 December 2013 16:57 | By Avril Lee, LifestyleAsia.com

Most wanted cameras of 2013

Here are five cameras we were dying to add to our collection this year, including the Nikon Df, Sony Alpa A7R, and Fujifilm X100S.


Most wanted cameras of 2013

There’s always a camera for every occasion. From heavyweight DSLRs to handy compacts, nothing beats owning a great camera that takes great pictures, every time.

Here are five cameras we can’t decide between this Christmas:

Nikon Df, price TBC.

The much-anticipated Nikon Df boasts the ultimate imaging technology on top of a tactile body of mechanical dials for setting anything from shutter speed to exposure compensation. With a 16.2 megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor, EXPEED 3 image processing engine, and an ISO range of 100-12800, users can expect great image quality in a generally smaller and lighter body than other DSLRs. The Df also allows photographers to make use of the full range of Nikon lenses, including non-AI lenses.

Nikon hasn’t forgotten about the cosmetic aspects of its new baby. The Df comes in black and silver with a leatherette finish, reminiscent of the classic silver halide film cameras; it also comprises of sturdy magnesium alloys and has superior weather-resistant and anti-dust capabilities.

Sony A7R, $2799 (body only).

Possibly one of the most desirable is the Sony A7R, the world’s first 35mm full-frame mirrorless compact camera. Technology has reached a stage where compact cameras are no longer sacrificing quality for size, and we’re thankful for that.

The Sony A7R (along with its sister A7) is one of the smallest and lightest interchangeable lens camera with a full-frame sensor that packs 36 megapixels for arguably the most amazing shots; its lack of an anti-aliasing filter means that the pictures are sharper than ever as well.

Fujifilm X100S, $1799.

The new X100S from Fujifilm might be one of the best compact cameras on the market this year. Its chic retro style is instantly appealing as most compact cameras are, but it’s no illusion; the camera is more than well-equipped for its deceivingly skimpy size.

The X100S is fitted with a fixed 23mm lens F2 lens and an SLR-sized APS-C sensor, with an improved manual focus system which includes focus peaking and split-image displays. Together with an EXR image processor, you can expect quality pictures that could compare to those taken by much higher-end camera models, at least to a certain extent. This is great if you’re a photography enthusiast but have to travel light.

Leica M Typ 240, price approx. $8000.

The Leica M is slow on startup, and sets you back way more than any good DSLR would. Yet, there’s something that this legend of a rangefinder camera can provide that others can’t.

Professional photographers will either scoff at the Leica M for its price, or desperately wish to have a good excuse to splurge on one. The fully manual-focus instrument produces impeccably sharp images with stunning colour and depth using a CMOS image sensor, and the fact that the lens can be switched out is even better. It’s not the fastest camera and wouldn’t be our ideal pick for sports or fast-paced action, but the Leica M is quite possibly the best full-colour digital camera they have produced yet.

Olympus OM-D E-M1

Olympus OM-D E-M1.

The successor to the older and more successful E-M5 is the Olympus OM-D E-M1. This camera has a micro 4/3 body, which trumps a full-frame sensor in terms of speed and usability, but sacrifices image quality in the process. Still, the cropped image is of good quality and is generally not a big deal to most camera users.

A main feature that users will be glad to note is that the electronic viewfinder of the E-M1 is of a high standard. You get to view how your picture will turn out before you snap the photo, so that you don’t need to go by trial and error to tweak settings. What’s great is that the E-M1 is very weather-proof and forgiving; its sturdy body is built to resist rain, frost and shock if it needs to. Whether your lens can do so as well is a different story.

Latest Photo Galleries on xinmsn

facebook recommendations